Tag Archives: jazz

Book cover: Rebelmusic

Jazz and Islam – A Retrospective Series (P.2)

Continued History

Text by Dawoud Kringle

In this part of the Jazz and Islam Series, I will provide a perspective on the growth of Islam among American jazz musicians.

The Mosque of Islamic BrotherhoodMany of the earlier converts to Islam worked at raising money to bring Muslim / Sufi teachers to the USA. Talib Daoud and his wife, singer Dakota Staton (a.k.a. Aliyah Rabia) taught Islam in Philadelphia, PA. She also opened a store in New York City that sold African art and wares, and Islamic books and supplies. An Egyptian man named Sheikh Mahmoud Hassan Rabwan taught Islam and Arabic there. In the New York area a few Muslim owned venues, mostly restaurants, opened that featured musical performances. These included “The East” and “The House of Peace.” Mosques such as the Mosque of Islamic Brotherhood used to hold benefit concerts, which featured performers such as Alice Coltrane, and others. Later, a performance venue opened by saxophonist, composer, bandleader, teacher, and mentor Muhammad Salahuddin (1930-2004) called “The University of the Streets” featured performances, workshops, and music instruction.

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Book cover: Rebelmusic

Jazz and Islam – A Retrospective Series (P.1)

Early History

Text by Dawoud Kringle

There exists little historical documentation of the music and musicians of Islamic culture indigenous to the United States of America. For this reason, I decided to write this series. While this is in no way comprehensive, it should serve as a brief introduction to the much neglected subject of Muslim’s contributions to jazz.

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CD Review: The Ochion Jewell Quartet’s CD “Volk” is a brilliantly execution of untapped possibilities hidden within traditional music

jewell_volk_coverArtist: Ochion Jewell Quartet
Title: Volk
Label: self-produced
Genre: minimal jazz/contemporary music

CD Review by Dawoud Kringle

I was unfamiliar with Ochion Jewell when I was first asked to review Volk. I did a little digging on his website and elsewhere. I found a quote he put on his bio page that spoke volumes: ““Growing up in Appalachian Kentucky without any music venues led to a strong connection to the inherent music of nature. No matter where I go, I can still feel the honesty of that place as the foundation of my art and who I am.” Jewell’s training and experience, first in classical music, then in jazz and improvised music, not to mention his work as a sideman with the likes of Smokey Robinson, Chaka Khan, Gregory Hines, Kid Rock, Meatloaf, George Strait, Crystal Gayle, and Michael McDonald, were instrumental in forming a unique musical personality.

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Is Jazz Dead?…The Tragedy of Jazz, And Its Reawakening

Text by Dawoud Kringle

Photo by Helge Øverås

Photo by Helge Øverås

“Jazz is not dead, it just smells funny.” Thus spoke Frank Zappa.

According to Nielson’s 2014 Year End Report (thejazzline.com/news/2015/03/jazz-least-popular-music-genre/), jazz & classical combined accounts for 1.4% of music consumed in the US.

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CR Review: Nils Wogram Root 70 With Strings (Germany) drawing on a wide variety of influences, and mixing them without strain

cover_riomar_400Artist: Nils Wogram Root 70 With Strings
Title: riomar
Label: nWog Records
Genre: jazz with strings

CD Review by Matt Cole

When last we heard from German-born trombonist Nils Wogram, he was leading a lively septet consisting of six horns and a drummer. This time around, on riomar, he uses an entirely different band, with his quartet Root 70, consisting of himself, Hayden Chisholm on alto sax, Matt Penman on bass, and Jochen Rueckert on drums; joined by a string section with Gerdur Gunnarsdottir on violin, Gareth Lubbe on viola, and Adrian Brendel on cello. riomar is just as creative as Complete Soul, while covering different (though overlapping) sonic space; and while just as energetic, is a bit gentler than Wogram’s all-but-one horn septet, as might be expected.

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