Category Archives: Books

Clive Stevens 2

Book Review: Clive Stevens’ Autobiography “This World and Other Worlds: Quest of a Light Warrior”

 

Clive StevensBook review by Dawoud Kringle

How does one go about writing an autobiography? Such a task is much easier said than done, and there are almost limitless pitfalls one must avoid in undertaking such a project. Of course the first question one must ask is this: why should I write an autobiography? What justifies committing the history of my life to the literary form?

Clive Stevens has answered that question.

Continue reading

John Lydon Book Cover

Book Review: JOHN LYDON “ANGER IS AN ENERGY: MY LIFE UNCENSORED” (P.2)

A book review by Dawoud Kringle

Virgin Records asked Lydon to go to Jamaica and assist with the reggae bands they were working with. This, like the American tour, proved an eye opening experience for Lydon. It exposed him to cultures that he’d never experienced or imagined, and expanded his perception of music, and humanity. From this, and his closing the chapter of the Sex Pistols in his life, Public Image Limited was born.

Public Image Limited (PiL) was an important step for Lydon. It afforded him the opportunity for an expanded rage of artistic and conceptions / lyrical expression. It also paved the way for Lydon’s adamant and inflexible refusal to be pigeonholed, labeled, and classified as an artist and a man. His songwriting expanded into the use of a variety of interesting concepts (a few examples: on “Poptones,” Lydon placed himself in the mind of a then highly publicized rape victim. On “Careering” he attacked both sides of the conflicts in North Ireland for allowing violence to escalate out of control over religious differences). Musically, Lydon and company were daring to experiment artistically and push the envelope well beyond the limits of the punk genre he was credited with founding.

Continue reading

John Lydon Book Cover

Book Review: JOHN LYDON “ANGER IS AN ENERGY: MY LIFE UNCENSORED” (P.1)

A book review by Dawoud Kringle

If ever there was a man who looked the whole world in the eye and said FUCK YOU!!!, it’s John Lydon. From the first few pages of the introduction, it was obvious that Lydon’s story, told in his own words, was going to be an intensely interesting read.

Lydon’s humble beginnings in North London (which he described as a “dustbin,” and “piss poor”) hard wired an attitude of rebellion into his psyche. He pointed out that he came from a rare point in British history where unquestioned subservience to national authority was not a given. This is not to say that the British had no civil disorder, but after WW2 much of this was swept under the carpet. People of Lydon’s intelligence, conviction, and imagination inevitably dragged this out of its hiding places.

Continue reading

Andrew Schulman, author and musician

Book Review: Andrew Schulman’s “Waking the Spirit:

 …a Musician’s Journey Healing Body, Mind, and Soul”

Book Review by Dawoud Kringle

Andrew Schulman book coverMusic is the oldest, and the newest, thing in medicine. There are centuries worth of traditions from every culture humanity ever produced that explore the practical application of music as a form of medicine. From the beginning of recorded history to around the 17th century, music was an integral part of medicine. When western allopathic medicine began to reveal details of human biology, they simultaneously instituted the erroneous idea that the human body is mere biology unconnected with the mind. Humanity has yet to fully recover from this disaster. Hundreds of books are written in English about music. The rise of the practice of music therapy, or medical applications of music in the west is, however, a relatively new phenomenon.

Continue reading

Book Review: John Kruth’s contribution to the world of Beatles literature

John Kruth bookAuthor: John Kruth
Title: This Bird Has Flown: The Enduring Beauty of Rubber Soul, Fifty Years On
Publisher: Backbeat Books

Book Review by Dawoud Kringle

The Beatles have earned the title of musical legend. Like them or not, there is no denying that their influence and accomplishments have been nothing less than monumental. As such, volumes have been written about them. So, if one dares assume the mantle of “Beatles Biographer”, one had better be ready to make a real contribution to an already formidable (and densely populated) lexicon.

Continue reading